netwit 2.01

Stratfor emails reveal secret, widespread TrapWire surveillance system



Stratfor emails reveal secret, widespread TrapWire surveillance system


RT, 10 August 2012


The sort of debate that must have ensued in what was then West Germany during the Baader-Meinhoff period, is beginning to happen in the States. The balance between protecting the population (and the State) and freedom of individuals to go about their lives without oppressive surveillance.


Interestingly, Britain has been full of surveillance camera for years, and no one has really bothered.






August 12, 2012 Posted by | surveillance technology, TrapWire | , , , | Leave a comment

Jamming Tripoli: Inside Moammar Gadhafi’s Secret Surveillance Network



Jamming Tripoli: Inside Moammar Gadhafi’s Secret Surveillance Network


By Matthieu Aikins, Wired, May 18, 2012



May 22, 2012 Posted by | 2TE Corproration, Amesys, Bull S.A., Eagle System, Global Online Freedom Act, HQ2, i2e Technologies, L-3 Communications, Narus, VASTech, ZXMT System | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CYBER RIGHTS Server Seizure, April 2012 [press release from Riseup Networks]



Server Seizure, April 2012

quote:

Some advocates of anonymity explain that it’s just a tradeoff — accepting the bad uses for the good ones — but there’s more to it than that. Criminals and other bad people have the motivation to learn how to get good anonymity, and many have the motivation to pay well to achieve it. Being able to steal and reuse the identities of innocent victims (identify theft) makes it even easier. Normal people, on the other hand, don’t have the time or money to spend figuring out how to get privacy online. This is the worst of all possible worlds.

So yes, criminals could in theory use mixmaster, but they already have better options, and it seems unlikely that taking mixmaster away from the world will stop them from doing bad things. At the same time, mixmaster and other privacy measures can fight identity theft, physical crimes like stalking, and so on. Please see the tor FAQ on abuse for more information.



Tor FAQ first point is :


Doesn’t Tor enable criminals to do bad things?

Criminals can already do bad things. Since they’re willing to break laws, they already have lots of options available that provide better privacy than Tor provides. They can steal cell phones, use them, and throw them in a ditch; they can crack into computers in Korea or Brazil and use them to launch abusive activities; they can use spyware, viruses, and other techniques to take control of literally millions of Windows machines around the world.

Tor aims to provide protection for ordinary people who want to follow the law. Only criminals have privacy right now, and we need to fix that.

Some advocates of anonymity explain that it’s just a tradeoff — accepting the bad uses for the good ones — but there’s more to it than that. Criminals and other bad people have the motivation to learn how to get good anonymity, and many have the motivation to pay well to achieve it. Being able to steal and reuse the identities of innocent victims (identity theft) makes it even easier. Normal people, on the other hand, don’t have the time or money to spend figuring out how to get privacy online. This is the worst of all possible worlds.

So yes, criminals could in theory use Tor, but they already have better options, and it seems unlikely that taking Tor away from the world will stop them from doing their bad things. At the same time, Tor and other privacy measures can fight identity theft, physical crimes like stalking, and so on.




April 20, 2012 Posted by | anonymous networks, anonymous remailers, cyber rights, European Counter Network [ECN], FBI, MayFirst/People Link, Mixmaster, Riseup Networks, Tor, Tor Project | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

BATTLE FOR THE INTERNET Google’s Sergey Brin: state filtering of dissent threatens web freedom



Day 3 Guardian 7 day series Battle for the Internet


Google’s Sergey Brin: state filtering of dissent threatens web freedom


Charles Arthur, Guardian 18 April 2012



April 18, 2012 Posted by | FaceBook, Google, Internet, Internet filtering, walled gardens | , , | Leave a comment

BATTLE FOR THE INTERNET Tim Berners-Lee urges government to stop the snooping bill



Guardian series: day 2: Battle of the Internet


Tim Berners-Lee urges government to stop the snooping bill


–Exclusive: Extension of surveillance powers ‘a destruction of human rights’


Ian Katz, Guardian, 17 April 2012



April 18, 2012 Posted by | FaceBook, GCHQ, Internet, native apps, network silos, online privacy, privacy, silo effect, Skype, social media, Tim Burners-Lee | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Assange attacks Sweden for Russian Internet traffic interception as experts express doubts



Assange attacks Sweden for Russian Internet traffic interception as experts express doubts


Malcolm Dixelius, an independent Swedish journalist, in exclusive an interview with Voice of Russia shed light on how the media reacted to Assange’s allegations.


The mention of the assertion was in:


I was the fall guy


where Assange talks with Jamie Kelsey-Fry, published in JUST, 12 April 2012



April 17, 2012 Posted by | Assange | Leave a comment

Battle for the internet – Guardian series


Battle for the internet



7 day series in the Guardian


Why not try starting with:



How tiny Estonia stepped out of the USSR’s shadow to become and internet titan


Patrick Kingsley, Sunday 15 April


refs.


wiki:Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence


wiki: ACTA [Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement ]



April 15, 2012 Posted by | ACTA, CCDCOE, Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence, Cyber Defence League [Estonia], cybersiege [Estonia], Estonia, Estonian Internet Community (EIC), Skype, Uncategorized, WiFi | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Misha Glenny on #cyber-security




The problem with cyber is that your assets are not the weapons that you control. Your assets are the vulnerabilities of your actual and potential enemies. In order to know your enemies’ vulnerabilities you have to find out where they are, and once you have got hold of them you cannot afford to let go.





Misha Glenny, author of Dark Market: Cyberthieves, Cybercops and You chooses five books on cybersecurity in The Browser FiveBooks Interview: Misha Glenny on Cyber Security.


He says there are three main types:


► cyber-crime
► cyber industrial espionage
► cyber-warfare


Here he discusses his book with Charlie Rose


refs

wiki:Stuxnet



April 13, 2012 Posted by | cyber attacks, Cyber Command, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-arms, cyber-tools, cyber-war, DDOS, Evgeny Morozov, Jonathan Zittrain, Misha Glenny, Natanz, Stuxnet, Titan Rain attacks | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selling You on Facebook



Selling You on Facebook

–Many popular Facebook apps are obtaining sensitive information about users—and users’ friends—so don’t be surprised if details about your religious, political and even sexual preferences start popping up in unexpected places.


By Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Shayndi Raice and Courtney Schley, WSJ, 8 April 2012



April 9, 2012 Posted by | apps, FaceBook, Helen Nissenbaum [privacy researcher], personal data, personal data economy, Privacy Bill of Rights, social media, social networks | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Turning the internet into a police state



Turning the internet into a police state

–A government that said it’d be ‘strong in defence of freedom’ now wants to spy on everything we do online.

Patrick Hayes

Spiked Magazine 3 April 2012

  • Spiked is written by mainly former Marxism Today folk

  • It’s libertarian/contrarian – so you’ll get defences of things you’d think would not be defended. Many of these pieces are well worth reading to get the old grey cells going, even if you find you are on the other side of the argument.  So, for example, you may well find a Spiked writer defending people’s right to smoke themselves to death, when you feel despite African farmers suffering, it would be far better overall to shut the tobacco factories down completely for the greater good (probably missing out the bit about how tobacco corporations push cigarettes onto African’s who haven’t got the medical services to sort them out when they get, say, severe bronchitis or forbid, cancer)




April 6, 2012 Posted by | Centre for Security and Intelligence Studies | | Leave a comment

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