netwit 2.01

#INTERNET #privacy #digitalforensics [@4ensics] ~ On the Web, Children Face Intensive Tracking: http://budurl.com/PrivacyWSJ



On the Web, Children Face Intensive Tracking


by


Steve Stecklow, Wall Street Journal, 17 Sept 2010
steve.stecklow@wsj.com


also:


Shunned Profiling Technology on the Verge of Comeback


* On the reappearence of badform wiki:Phorm


In my scrabble to Rolodex this blog, I haven’t bothered to make any comments of my own, letting the trend of the material indicate where I am coming from/going to. It isn’t difficult to imagine Govt 1.0 scrambling to find technologies to help them keep ahead of their populations. Govt 2.0 and Citizen 2.0 evident in many places: it won’t be long before there is talk of Govt 3.0, which will be another way of talking P2P politics/society qua Michel Bauwens





January 12, 2011 Posted by | actor-network theory, asset misuse, Citizen 2.0, connective knowledge, connectivism, conspiracy, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cypherpunk, digital forensics, encryption, Govt 3.0, hacker culture, Internet, Julian Assange, National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, Network security, network theory, on-line rights, Open data, open source, Phorm, privacy, techno-libertarianism, The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto, Tim Burners-Lee, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#WEB+#WIKILEAKS+#ASSANGE+#Jónsdóttir – Did Julian Assange Learn The Politics Of V For Vendetta From Birgitta Jónsdóttir?






Did Julian Assange Learn The Politics Of V For Vendetta From Birgitta Jónsdóttir?



January 10, 2011 Posted by | Birgitta Jónsdóttir, cognitive infilltration, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cyberpunk, cypherpunk, Government 2.0, hacker culture, internet activism, Jónsdóttir, Julian Assange, V for Vendetta, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

INTERNET WEB Cyberspace Policy Review



Cyberspace Policy Review
– Assuring a Trusted and Resilient Information and Communications Infrastructure

* 76 page draft paper

* Useful  timeline graphic on page 78, titled  ‘History Informs Our Future’ from 1900 to the present, which highlights key technological and legal milestones.



Open in another tab to read.


Kim Cameron’s Identity Blog post 27 June 2010 gives short review:

National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace



January 10, 2011 Posted by | Bradley Manning, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyberpunk, cyberspace, Cyberspace Policy Review, cypherpunk, data leakage, Department of Homeland Security, encryption, Government 2.0, hacker culture, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, Julian Assange, Manning, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, Network security, network theory, NSA, NSTIC, Open data, open source, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), Semantic Web, social media, social networks, social semantic web, social silos, techno-libertarianism, Tim Burners-Lee, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

INTERNET WEB WIKILEAKS The wider perspective










DebateGraph : WikiLeaks



December 23, 2010 Posted by | asset misuse, broadband, Bruno Latour, Citizen 2.0, compliance, connective knowledge, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyberspace, data journalism, data leakage, DebateGraph, Department of Homeland Security, digital journalism, Government 2.0, Guardian, insider threats, Internet, Iraq war logs, Julian Assange, Manning, MTI, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), net neutrality, network anomalies, Network security, network theory, Open data, PCNAA, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), public statistics, RIIA, rogue employee, Semantic Web, SIPRNET, Tim Burners-Lee, U.S.Embassy cables, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

CYBERSPACE Cyber Storm II National Cyber Exercise



Cyber Storm II National Cyber Exercise

Fact Sheet from Department of Home Security

DHS Kicks Off Next Cyber Security Excercise

 

In a nutshell graphically:

 

 



Right mouse into another tab for a larger version.


Department of Homeland Secuity Organisational chart




December 21, 2010 Posted by | cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyberspace, data leakage, Department of Homeland Security, insider security, insider threats, Internet, Network security, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA) | Leave a comment

CYBER SECURITY “On Cyber Warfare” (A November 2010 Chatham House Report)



On Cyber Warfare

A Chatham House Report

November 2010

Paul Cornish, David Livingstone David Clememte, and Clare York

Royal Institute of International Affairs

It’s a biggie: 49 pages. But worth the effort. Final conclusion:

The crux of the problem, however, is that while there might be plenty of politics associated with actual or potential cyber warfare events around the world, we do not see that cyber warfare is a politically constrained phenomenon in the Clausewitzian
sense. We describe cyberspace as terra nullius, currently beyond the reach of mature political discourse. In other
words, it is the absence of a constraining political framework around cyber warfare that makes cyberspace so attractive
as a place in which to achieve cultural, religious, economic, social and even – paradoxically – political goals. We argue
that cyber warfare must be bounded by a Clausewitzian framework of analysis, and that framework must also be
transformed by cyber warfare. In this way national strategy will adapt to the emerging challenges of cyber warfare,
which will in turn be guided by the stabilizing norms and values that national strategy – and only national strategy –
can provide.




December 21, 2010 Posted by | cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyberspace, RIIA, Royal Institute of International Affairs | Leave a comment

NETWORK NEUTRALITY What is it? Is it a good thing?




The Wikipedia entry for network neutrality is detailed and a good starting point for anyone thinking of puzzling out for the first time which side they might be on. There are 100 references and a good selection of external links.

The inventor of the World Wide Web, Sir Tim Berner- Lee is all for it. He writes in Long Live the Web: A Call for Continued Open Standards and Neutrality ( Scientific American, 22 November 2010) of “..examining the world through a neutral communications medium”, the dangers of “walled gardens” within the web such as social networks like FaceBook, and the need to partition the design of the web from the Internet (“The two layers of technology work together but can advance independently.”)

Some of it is stirring stuff:

Looking back to the Magna Carta, we should perhaps now affirm: “No person or organization shall be deprived of the ability to connect to others without due process of law and the presumption of innocence.




December 21, 2010 Posted by | cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyberspace, data journalism, data leakage, digital journalism, Government 2.0, Internet packet, net neutrality, Network security, network theory, Open data, Phorm, Tim Burners-Lee, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

CYBERSECURITY Richard E Clarke talk at 2010 Netwitness User Conference



The Three Challenges of Cyberspace: Cyber Crime, Cyber Espionage, and Cyber War

By

Richard Clarke

Former top counter-terrorism advisor under President Clinton, who later served as President Bush’s cybersecurity czar

* One important point he makes is the need for the governments to have control of packets

This means the filtering out of supect packets of data such as worms before they reach where they were intended to go. This throws us right back into the net neutrality debate. The ordinary compeletely untechnical person who begins to think, assumes this is happening anyway, but that we’re not told about it. What is reasonably widely known – through cases thrown up by the media – is that governments such as the U.S. have a legal right to demand data stored on servers in certain cases.

This leads to the debate about the electronic police state. Note in there, the extent to which the UK has gone. e.g. the MTI programme. ” GCHQ project called Mastering the Internet (MTI). It will include thousands of deep packet inspection probes inside communications providers’ networks”

Richard Clarke Citizenium entry gives full background


Fact or fiction?

You try to make up you mind:

The Attack Coming From Bytes, Not Bombs

Richard Clarke’s Cyberwar: File Under Fiction


December 21, 2010 Posted by | cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyberspace, MTI | Leave a comment