netwit 2.01

Misha Glenny on #cyber-security




The problem with cyber is that your assets are not the weapons that you control. Your assets are the vulnerabilities of your actual and potential enemies. In order to know your enemies’ vulnerabilities you have to find out where they are, and once you have got hold of them you cannot afford to let go.





Misha Glenny, author of Dark Market: Cyberthieves, Cybercops and You chooses five books on cybersecurity in The Browser FiveBooks Interview: Misha Glenny on Cyber Security.


He says there are three main types:


► cyber-crime
► cyber industrial espionage
► cyber-warfare


Here he discusses his book with Charlie Rose


refs

wiki:Stuxnet



April 13, 2012 Posted by | cyber attacks, Cyber Command, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-arms, cyber-tools, cyber-war, DDOS, Evgeny Morozov, Jonathan Zittrain, Misha Glenny, Natanz, Stuxnet, Titan Rain attacks | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hugo Chávez Gets a Twitter Account [4 books reviews]



Hugo Chávez Gets a Twitter Account


Christian Caryl (19 April 2011) reviews :


Daniel Domscheit-Berg, Inside WikiLeaks: My Time with Julian Assange at the World’s Most Dangerous Website (New York: Crown, 2011), 304 pp., $23.00.

David Leigh and Luke Harding, WikiLeaks: Inside Julian Assange’s War on Secrecy (New York: PublicAffairs, 2011), 352 pp.

Evgeny Morozov, The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom (New York: PublicAffairs, 2011), 432 pp.

Clay Shirky, Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age (New York: The Penguin Press, 2010), 256 pp.




April 20, 2011 Posted by | Clay Shirkey, crowd sourcing, cyber-auxiliaries, cyber-utopianism, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, Evgeny Morozov, lamestream media, netizen, social media, socket puppets | Leave a comment

#Internet #Egypt ~ How Egypt Killed the Internet [http://on.wsj.com/hMdA4J] [http://bit.ly/hH4AnD]



How Egypt Killed the Internet


* The techie side simplified for the Netwit



January 30, 2011 Posted by | Cory Doctorow, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cyberpunk, cyberspace, cypherpunk, Evgeny Morozov, Internet, internet activism, Internet censorship, Internet filtering, internet-centrism, social media | Leave a comment

#Internet #Socialmedia #Evegenymorozov – Setting up a straw dog? [http://bit.ly/gUppgD] [http://bit.ly/hH4AnD]



First Thoughts on Tunisia and the role of the Internet


Evgeny Morozov, Foreign Policy, 14 Jan 2011

“What strikes me about events in Tunisia is that social media seems to have failed in what many of us thought would be its greatest contribution (outside of social mobilization) — that is, in helping to generate and shape the coverage of events in the mainstream media. On the contrary, despite all the buzz on Twitter it took four weeks to get the events in Tunisia on the front pages of major newspapers, at least here in the U.S. (the situation in Europe was somewhat better — and it was way better in the Middle East — for all the obvious reasons). “



Reading that is a reminder governments have always used the latest technology against their people as effectively as peoples used it against their governments. It’s just different technology. The Ancient Regime smashed printing presses. The political groups set up other ones to pump out the revolutionary pamphlets. In pre-revolutionary Russia, the government would have tapped plenty of phones abuzz with the news that the sealed train containing Lenin had set off from Zurich.

The irony is that self-appointed social media gurus have set up straw dogs which they themselves find they are having to drag down. And that includes Morozov, who apparently was some sort of blog specialist.

To try to make an argument in a large book, that the downsides of social media out-way the ups, is hard to pull off.

Social media proved very effective in U.S. elections.

To argue that they are of little use or their effectiveness in social mobilisation is minimal because authoritarian regimes are quick to use the same media to catch internet activists, is little different from saying regimes rounded up activists before social media existed. It’s probably true, in the case of Tunisia, many more Tunisians outside Tunisia were Tweeting and using FaceBook than inside it. But these messages will have been in Arabic and French which some inside Tunisia got to read and pass on in some way or another. They still used the telephone, email and read the papers, listened for radio from all round the world and watched satellite TV. No one is suggesting that social media were the only avenue for protest and social mobilisation. Words of encouragement will have spread by less high tech means. Comms didn’t begin and end with social media. This is the internet-centrist position, which is only to be expected from people who live by the internet, web and clever software.

Anti-government activism in Iran started with blogs, long before FaceBook and Twitter. They arrested bloggers. Just because the Iranian election protests were organised with the help of mobile phones, text messaging, and social media, and this helped the government to track the activists, doesn’t mean to say it wasn’t effective.

A more honest and true answer, and one that didn’t need a whole book to argue is that it helped both in different ways. That governments have learnt to hack social media, can surely only mean that pretty good encryption will be taken up by greater numbers.



January 29, 2011 Posted by | Evgeny Morozov, Internet, internet activism, Internet censorship, Internet filtering, Tunisia, Tunisian cyberactivists, Twitter | Leave a comment

#Internet #Egypt ~ How Egypt Killed the Internet [http://on.wsj.com/hMdA4J [http://bit.ly/hH4AnD]


How Egypt Killed the Internet


Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Wall Street Journal, 29 Jan 2011




side-comment

The man who pooh-poohs social media in his book The Net Delusion, but who is himself a master of their use to promote his very book, asks in a Tweet if Egypt will be appointing a Minister for Twitter and FaceBook. I wrote a general reply to him with a #evgenymorozov (he is not following me) suggesting they may also be thinking about a Minister for Vodaphone – the Egyptian government shut down the whole mobile network as well as tampering with the social media.



January 29, 2011 Posted by | Egypt, Evgeny Morozov, FaceBook, Internet, internet activism, Internet censorship, Internet filtering, Twitter | 1 Comment

#netactivism #evgenymorozov ~ #corydoctorow examines The Net Delusion [http://bit.ly/gM1R5i]



We need a serious critique of net activism

The Net Delusion argues that technology isn’t necessarily good for freedom – but how else can the oppressed have a voice?


by


Cory Doctorow


Guardian, 25 Jan 2011



January 27, 2011 Posted by | cognitive infiltration, Cory Doctorow, cyber-utopianism, Evgeny Morozov, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, Iran, net activism, Open data, slacktivism, Tunisia, Twitter | Leave a comment

#INTERNET #China #firewall #greatfirewallofchina





There is a US gov site which has a good summary of China and filtering, but I’ve lost it in a sudden browser shut down. And I haven’t managed to re-Google it. See it, let me know. Or anything else similarly comprehensive.

In the meantime a Der Spiegel starter from which there are some ideas to work with :

How China Leads the World in Web Censorship



January 19, 2011 Posted by | China, Citizen 2.0, cognitive infilltration, connectivism, cyber security, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cyberspace, Der Spiegel, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Evgeny Morozov, Government 2.0, Govt 3.0, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, information silos, Internet, Internet filtering, internet-centrism | | Leave a comment

#SOCIALMEDIA #cyber-utopianism #internet-centrism #BBCNewsnight [http://bit.ly/fNrj7i] @evgenymorozov ~ The Power of the Internet, Not?



Eugeny Morozov{ EM about}, author of The Net Delusion, will be on Newsnight 17 Jan 2011.



January 17, 2011 Posted by | "Collateral Murder" video, actor-network theory, Afghanistan documents, anonymity online, anonymous whistleblowing, Birgitta Jónsdóttir, Bradley Manning, Canberra cyber security centre, China, Citizen 2.0, citizen journalism, cognitive infilltration, connective knowledge, connectivism, crowd sourcing, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cyberpunk, cyberspace, Cyberspace Policy Review, cypherpunk, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, Daniel Ellsberg, data journalism, data leakage, data security, data-dump journalism, Defence Signals Directorate (DSD, Department of Homeland Security, Der Spiegel, digital forensics, digital journalism, diplomatic cables, Echelon spy system, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), encryption, Evgeny Morozov, FaceBook, FGI, free government information [FGI], Frontline Club, Government 2.0, hacker culture, Hrafnsson, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, information silos, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, investigative journalism, Iraq War 2003, Iraq war logs, Jaron Lanier, Jónsdóttir, Julian Assange, Manning, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, network anomalies, Network security, network theory, NSA, on-line rights, ontology, Open data, open source, organisational network analysis, P2P, P2P Foundation, Peer-to-Peer, Phorm, Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), privacy, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), rogue employee, Semantic Web, silo effect, Single Person Organisation [SPO], social media, social networks, social semantic web, social silos, techno-libertarianism, The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto, Tim Burners-Lee, Tor, trust, trust models, Twitter, Virtual Private Network (VPN), virtual tunnel, visualisation, Web 2.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

INTERNET BOOK REVIEW The Net Delusion by Evgeny Morozov



Tom Chatfield, Guardian 9 January 2010:

The Net Delusion: How Not to Liberate the World by Evgeny Morozov – review

– This powerful critique of ‘cyber-utopianism’ shows us that the net isn’t always what we think

 

Two delusions in particular concern Morozov: “cyber-utopianism”, the belief that the culture of the internet is inherently emancipatory; and “internet-centrism”, the belief that every important question about modern society and politics can be framed in terms of the internet.


January 9, 2011 Posted by | cyber-utopianism, Evgeny Morozov, internet-centrism | Leave a comment