netwit 2.01

Revealed: US spy operation that manipulates social media


Revealed: US spy operation that manipulates social media

— Military’s ‘sock puppet’ software creates fake online identities to spread pro-American propaganda


Nick Fielding and Ian Cobain, Guardian, 17 March 2011


which links to


America’s absurd stab at systematising sock puppetry
–The US has a chance to move on from a history of clandestine foreign policy – instead it acts like a clumsy spammer


Jeff Jarvis, Guardian, 17 March 2011


which links to


The internet: Everything you ever need to know

–In spite of all the answers the internet has given us, its full potential to transform our lives remains the great unknown. Here are the nine key steps to understanding the most powerful tool of our age – and where it’s taking us


John Naughton, Guardian, 20 June 2010



March 20, 2011 Posted by | Government 2.0, Govt 3.0, Internet, internet activism, Internet censorship, Internet filtering, internet-centrism, Jeff Jarvis, John Naughton, net neutrality, Network security, social media, trust models | Leave a comment

#INTERNET #encryption #PgP #P2P ~ Who owns the Internet and does it matter?



Well, I don’t that’s for certain. Just the PC, some copper cables and a router. I’ve got a computer ID and a URL for any site I maintain. I’ve no idea what happens to those little packets of digital data that stream in and out of the router. They tell me Skype is encrypted, but how would I know?

Plenty of people can learn lots about me. Social media give a lot away to anyone caring to look. Governments will almost certainly have automatic systems to check who is saying what to whom on the Internet. If they don’t they will be buying the software to do so right now.



Internet black holes

The logical direction is a full-encrypted P2P world. The downside of a PgP P2P (as opposed to client-server, where only servers supply) world is no one else can know what’s being said between these two people. (Entrance, stage left, cipherpunk Julian Assange, encryption software in hand) Sometimes even Internet People might be happy for their governments to have ways of finding things out. The trend is more towards individuals giving up their privacy in return for what the Internet and Web provides in exchange. Both governments and non-governmental organisations are taking full advantage of this while it lasts.

The give-up-your-privacy-social-media seem to be in a cross over graph with Govt 1.0 which is in the process of changing to Govt 2.0, most wholeheartedly in local govt. At the moment social media are just underneath the cross-over. WikiLeaks and others are pushing the whole thing up to the cross-over a lot quicker. The biggest thing from WikiLeaks will be a unrelenting exposure of kleptocratic government. Even non-kleptocrats will be worrying about this: so many democratic govts. have cosy relationships with kleptocrasies. France recently had one with Tunisia. Was that because they were selling them french made armaments? Some of the U.S.A’s best friends are keptocrats. Easier to do big arms deals with them, too. Who does Indonesia buy its military harware from? Israel, which is not a kleptocracy except in that the U.S. govt.hands an awful lot of American tax payer’s money over to it without asking. So in a sense it’s an inverse Kleptocracy, in which a state not individuals receives the handout. So the U.S. govt. is doing the stealing from its own people to keep another sate going.

Who owns the Internet is an important question. If governments feel they are getting locked out of individuals lives, they may want to more impose rules on Internet usage that P2P-type people don’t want or like.

Tim Bermers-Lee is the most prominent advocate of a neutral Net. Most people haven’t the faintest idea what this would mean or require in practice. It’s not going to happen if every no-democratic state keeps control of the copper wires, optical fibe and satellites they put into space.

The reason I found Wikileaks interesting and thought it would be a good idea to set up a WikiLeaks dedicated blog, was partly because it was an ideal opportunity to re-examine the wider implications of the Internet and Web. Anyone with half an ear for the digital zietgeist can’t fail to read up on the implications of WikLeaks and other areas of change in the digital arena.

One of these things is the Govt 2.0 The problem arises when a yawning Govt. 2.0 gap builds up, say between authoritarian states and democracies. This is not exactly a firm basis for net neutrality (or open data) if the U.S. becomes compeletely open and China remains closed. In fact, the ways things go, it is inevitable that the U.S. will drag China kicking and screaming intop the open world

Both types of states have an interest in reading the minds of their citizens. Interestinglt social media such as faceBook and twitter are the simplest and easiest way for them to do so. Every new digital technology has a downside.

P2P proper only arrives when there is Pretty Good privacy for all. And yet no govt. wasnt this because they have got used to checking on peopoe with the technology uptodate.

Coinciding with a recent WikiLeaks leak a lot of publicity for Govt 2.0 and visualisation techniques through the work on the WikLeaks data but others.


repost:

OPEN DATA Initiatives and visualisation techniques



January 20, 2011 Posted by | anonymity online, Canberra cyber security centre, China, connective knowledge, connectivism, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cyberspace, cypherpunk, digital forensics, digital journalism, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), encryption, FaceBook, FGI, free government information [FGI], Government 2.0, Govt 3.0, hacker culture, info-war, information silos, Internet, internet activism, Internet filtering, Julian Assange, Mark Zuckerberg, net neutrality, network anomalies, Network security, network theory, on-line rights, Open data, open source, P2P, P2P Foundation, Peer-to-Peer, Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), privacy, Semantic Web, silo effect, social media, social networks, Tim Burners-Lee, trust models, Twitter, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#SOCIALMEDIA #cyber-utopianism #internet-centrism #BBCNewsnight [http://bit.ly/fNrj7i] @evgenymorozov ~ The Power of the Internet, Not?



Eugeny Morozov{ EM about}, author of The Net Delusion, will be on Newsnight 17 Jan 2011.



January 17, 2011 Posted by | "Collateral Murder" video, actor-network theory, Afghanistan documents, anonymity online, anonymous whistleblowing, Birgitta Jónsdóttir, Bradley Manning, Canberra cyber security centre, China, Citizen 2.0, citizen journalism, cognitive infilltration, connective knowledge, connectivism, crowd sourcing, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cyberpunk, cyberspace, Cyberspace Policy Review, cypherpunk, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, Daniel Ellsberg, data journalism, data leakage, data security, data-dump journalism, Defence Signals Directorate (DSD, Department of Homeland Security, Der Spiegel, digital forensics, digital journalism, diplomatic cables, Echelon spy system, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), encryption, Evgeny Morozov, FaceBook, FGI, free government information [FGI], Frontline Club, Government 2.0, hacker culture, Hrafnsson, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, information silos, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, investigative journalism, Iraq War 2003, Iraq war logs, Jaron Lanier, Jónsdóttir, Julian Assange, Manning, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, network anomalies, Network security, network theory, NSA, on-line rights, ontology, Open data, open source, organisational network analysis, P2P, P2P Foundation, Peer-to-Peer, Phorm, Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), privacy, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), rogue employee, Semantic Web, silo effect, Single Person Organisation [SPO], social media, social networks, social semantic web, social silos, techno-libertarianism, The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto, Tim Burners-Lee, Tor, trust, trust models, Twitter, Virtual Private Network (VPN), virtual tunnel, visualisation, Web 2.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#TUNISIA #WIKILEAKS #socialmedia #twitrev ~ Was What Happened in Tunisia a Twitter Revolution?



Was What Happened in Tunisia a Twitter Revolution?


Mathew Ingram, 14 Jan 2011



January 15, 2011 Posted by | actor-network theory, diplomatic cables, info-war, Internet, internet activism, investigative journalism, Iraq war logs, Julian Assange, net neutrality, network theory, on-line rights, Open data, P2P, Twitter, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#TUNISIA #WIKILEAKS #socialmedia #twitrev ~ Twitter revolution and the new Arab Media Space?



Tunisia and the New Arab Media Space
Marc Lynch, Foreign Policy, 15 Jan 2011


Tunisia: Can We Please Stop Talking About ‘Twitter Revolutions’
Luke Allnutt, Tanglered Web blog, 15 Jan 2011




The WDIK column
Twitter is proving to be important. It wouldn’t be so important if there were no mobile feeds into the system.

The Tunisian authorities, it is reported, had the Internet as tight as a gnats bottom – as China has. Though the news is that just before he flew the coop to Malta/France/Saudi Arabia (probably right now sitting down by the poolside with an ice-cool Carlesberg, evoking for me the iconic Heinekin scene at the end of Ice Cold in Alex…oh, perhaps not, it’s a dry country),



Internet Ali removed some of the filters. Or – as we’ll learn sooner than later – the current regime did, in order to reduce the pressure.



January 15, 2011 Posted by | actor-network theory, anonymity online, anonymous whistleblowing, China, Citizen 2.0, citizen journalism, connective knowledge, connectivism, cyber security, cyber-utopianism, cyberspace, data journalism, data leakage, data security, data-dump journalism, digital journalism, diplomatic cables, Government 2.0, Govt 3.0, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, investigative journalism, Julian Assange, Manning, media, net neutrality, Network security, network theory, on-line rights, Open data, open source, P2P, P2P Foundation, Peer-to-Peer, privacy, Single Person Organisation [SPO], social media, social networks, techno-libertarianism, Tim Burners-Lee, trust, trust models, Twitter, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks, WikiLeaks vs. The Yes Men | Leave a comment

#WIKILEAKS A capacity for trust model




CEOs say creativity most important in next 5 years





Both from The Practice of Leadership blog by George Ambler.



January 15, 2011 Posted by | actor-network theory, anonymity online, anonymous whistleblowing, Citizen 2.0, citizen journalism, cognitive infilltration, connective knowledge, connectivism, conspiracy, crowd sourcing, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, data leakage, data security, digital forensics, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), encryption, Government 2.0, Govt 3.0, hacker culture, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, insider security, Internet, internet activism, investigative journalism, Julian Assange, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, network anomalies, network e-discovery, Network security, network theory, on-line rights, Open data, open source, P2P, P2P Foundation, Peer-to-Peer, Semantic Web, social media, social networks, social semantic web, trust, trust models, Twitter, Web 2.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#INTERNET #privacy ~ Australia’s new cyber-warefare facility [http://bit.ly/fjOrlJ]



Australia’s new cyber-warefare facility



January 12, 2011 Posted by | ASIO, Canberra cyber security centre, Citizen 2.0, cognitive infilltration, connective knowledge, connectivism, conspiracy, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cyberspace, Cyberspace Policy Review, cypherpunk, data journalism, data leakage, Defence Signals Directorate, Defence Signals Directorate (DSD, Department of Homeland Security, digital forensics, digital journalism, DSD, encryption, free government information [FGI], Government 2.0, Govt 3.0, hacker culture, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, information silos, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, Julian Assange, Manning, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, network anomalies, Network security, on-line rights, Open data, open source, P2P, P2P Foundation, Peer-to-Peer, Phorm, privacy, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), Semantic Web, silo effect, Single Person Organisation [SPO], social media, social networks, social semantic web, techno-libertarianism, The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto, Tim Burners-Lee, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, Unique Personality Organisation [UPO], Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#INTERNET #privacy #digitalforensics [@4ensics] ~ On the Web, Children Face Intensive Tracking: http://budurl.com/PrivacyWSJ



On the Web, Children Face Intensive Tracking


by


Steve Stecklow, Wall Street Journal, 17 Sept 2010
steve.stecklow@wsj.com


also:


Shunned Profiling Technology on the Verge of Comeback


* On the reappearence of badform wiki:Phorm


In my scrabble to Rolodex this blog, I haven’t bothered to make any comments of my own, letting the trend of the material indicate where I am coming from/going to. It isn’t difficult to imagine Govt 1.0 scrambling to find technologies to help them keep ahead of their populations. Govt 2.0 and Citizen 2.0 evident in many places: it won’t be long before there is talk of Govt 3.0, which will be another way of talking P2P politics/society qua Michel Bauwens





January 12, 2011 Posted by | actor-network theory, asset misuse, Citizen 2.0, connective knowledge, connectivism, conspiracy, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cypherpunk, digital forensics, encryption, Govt 3.0, hacker culture, Internet, Julian Assange, National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, Network security, network theory, on-line rights, Open data, open source, Phorm, privacy, techno-libertarianism, The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto, Tim Burners-Lee, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

INTERNET WEB Cyberspace Policy Review



Cyberspace Policy Review
– Assuring a Trusted and Resilient Information and Communications Infrastructure

* 76 page draft paper

* Useful  timeline graphic on page 78, titled  ‘History Informs Our Future’ from 1900 to the present, which highlights key technological and legal milestones.



Open in another tab to read.


Kim Cameron’s Identity Blog post 27 June 2010 gives short review:

National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace



January 10, 2011 Posted by | Bradley Manning, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyberpunk, cyberspace, Cyberspace Policy Review, cypherpunk, data leakage, Department of Homeland Security, encryption, Government 2.0, hacker culture, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, Julian Assange, Manning, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, Network security, network theory, NSA, NSTIC, Open data, open source, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), Semantic Web, social media, social networks, social semantic web, social silos, techno-libertarianism, Tim Burners-Lee, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

INTERNET WEB National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace #NSTIC



National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace

– Creating Options for Enhanced Online Security and Privacy

June 25, 2010

 

* Department of Home Security draft paper

*  Proposal for an Indentity Ecosystem Framework

* Appendix of terms



January 10, 2011 Posted by | cypherpunk, data journalism, data leakage, Department of Homeland Security, digital journalism, encryption, Government 2.0, hacker culture, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, investigative journalism, Julian Assange, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, network anomalies, Network security, network theory, NSA, NSTIC, Open data, open source | Leave a comment