netwit 2.01

#socialmedia #twitter #malcolmgladwell [http://nyr.kr/9BaUkk] [http://bit.ly/hH4AnD]



Small Change
– Why the revolution will not be tweeted.

by

Malcolm Gladwell

New Yorker October 4, 2010



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January 29, 2011 Posted by | Malcolm Gladwell, social media, social networks, social silos, The Dragonfly Effect, Twitter | 2 Comments

#SOCIALMEDIA #cyber-utopianism #internet-centrism #BBCNewsnight [http://bit.ly/fNrj7i] @evgenymorozov ~ The Power of the Internet, Not?



Eugeny Morozov{ EM about}, author of The Net Delusion, will be on Newsnight 17 Jan 2011.



January 17, 2011 Posted by | "Collateral Murder" video, actor-network theory, Afghanistan documents, anonymity online, anonymous whistleblowing, Birgitta Jónsdóttir, Bradley Manning, Canberra cyber security centre, China, Citizen 2.0, citizen journalism, cognitive infilltration, connective knowledge, connectivism, crowd sourcing, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyber-utopianism, cyberpunk, cyberspace, Cyberspace Policy Review, cypherpunk, Daniel Domscheit-Berg, Daniel Ellsberg, data journalism, data leakage, data security, data-dump journalism, Defence Signals Directorate (DSD, Department of Homeland Security, Der Spiegel, digital forensics, digital journalism, diplomatic cables, Echelon spy system, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), encryption, Evgeny Morozov, FaceBook, FGI, free government information [FGI], Frontline Club, Government 2.0, hacker culture, Hrafnsson, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, information silos, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, investigative journalism, Iraq War 2003, Iraq war logs, Jaron Lanier, Jónsdóttir, Julian Assange, Manning, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, network anomalies, Network security, network theory, NSA, on-line rights, ontology, Open data, open source, organisational network analysis, P2P, P2P Foundation, Peer-to-Peer, Phorm, Pretty Good Privacy (PGP), privacy, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), rogue employee, Semantic Web, silo effect, Single Person Organisation [SPO], social media, social networks, social semantic web, social silos, techno-libertarianism, The Crypto Anarchist Manifesto, Tim Burners-Lee, Tor, trust, trust models, Twitter, Virtual Private Network (VPN), virtual tunnel, visualisation, Web 2.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

INTERNET WEB Cyberspace Policy Review



Cyberspace Policy Review
– Assuring a Trusted and Resilient Information and Communications Infrastructure

* 76 page draft paper

* Useful  timeline graphic on page 78, titled  ‘History Informs Our Future’ from 1900 to the present, which highlights key technological and legal milestones.



Open in another tab to read.


Kim Cameron’s Identity Blog post 27 June 2010 gives short review:

National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace



January 10, 2011 Posted by | Bradley Manning, cyber attacks, cyber crime, cyber espionage, cyber security, cyber terrorism, cyber warfare, cyberpunk, cyberspace, Cyberspace Policy Review, cypherpunk, data leakage, Department of Homeland Security, encryption, Government 2.0, hacker culture, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, Julian Assange, Manning, National Center for Cybersecurity and Communications (NCCC), National Security Agency [NSA], National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, net neutrality, Network security, network theory, NSA, NSTIC, Open data, open source, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), Semantic Web, social media, social networks, social semantic web, social silos, techno-libertarianism, Tim Burners-Lee, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

QUOTE INTERNET WEB SOCIAL NETWORKS Tim Berners – Lee



Long Live the Web: A Call for Continued Open Standards and Neutrality

– The Web is critical not merely to the digital revolution but to our continued prosperity—and even our liberty. Like democracy itself, it needs defending

Tim Berners – Lee, Scientific American, 22 November 2010

Social-networking sites present a different kind of problem. Facebook, LinkedIn, Friendster and others typically provide value by capturing information as you enter it: your birthday, your e-mail address, your likes, and links indicating who is friends with whom and who is in which photograph. The sites assemble these bits of data into brilliant databases and reuse the information to provide value-added service—but only within their sites. Once you enter your data into one of these services, you cannot easily use them on another site. Each site is a silo, walled off from the others. Yes, your site’s pages are on the Web, but your data are not. You can access a Web page about a list of people you have created in one site, but you cannot send that list, or items from it, to another site.

The isolation occurs because each piece of information does not have a URI. Connections among data exist only within a site. So the more you enter, the more you become locked in. Your social-networking site becomes a central platform—a closed silo of content, and one that does not give you full control over your information in it. The more this kind of architecture gains widespread use, the more the Web becomes fragmented, and the less we enjoy a single, universal information space.

A related danger is that one social-networking site—or one search engine or one browser—gets so big that it becomes a monopoly, which tends to limit innovation. As has been the case since the Web began, continued grassroots innovation may be the best check and balance against any one company or government that tries to undermine universality. GnuSocial and Diaspora are projects on the Web that allow anyone to create their own social network from their own server, connecting to anyone on any other site. The Status.net project, which runs sites such as identi.ca, allows you to operate your own Twitter-like network without the Twitter-like centralization.




January 9, 2011 Posted by | information silos, silo effect, social media, social networks, social silos, Tim Burners-Lee, Uncategorized | Leave a comment