netwit 2.01

Julian Assange: The Unauthorised Autobiography – review



Julian Assange: The Unauthorised Autobiography – review


–For a book born amid such ill-feeling, Julian Assange’s memoir is surprisingly revealing


Henry Porter, Observer, 2 October 2011



October 2, 2011 Posted by | Assange, cypherpunk, Israel Shamir, Julian Assange, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, whistleblowers, WikiLeaks | , | Leave a comment

Will the WikiLeaks cable leaks do more harm than good?



Will the WikiLeaks cable leaks do more harm than good?


Compare opinions of world leading experts and influencers, from TakeOnIt



April 25, 2011 Posted by | U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#Tunileaks



Tunileaks



March 22, 2011 Posted by | Tunisia, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#wikileaks #USembassycable #social media #Indonesia [http://bit.ly/hUj0Zy]



WikiLeaks: the latest developments
Turkish airbase used as refuelling stop for US rendition flights and fears on ‘Baby Doc’ Duvalier, plus social media strategy in Indonesia and the latest WikiLeaks news and views

* Guardian summary

Indonesia cable:

US embassy cables: Jakarta embassy requests $100k for its social media strategy

* Indonesia’s emerging Internet community:

“….roughly 10% of the population able to access the internet at least monthly, this represents over 25 million people, nearly half of whom are on Facebook. ”

* Mission Indonesia requests $100,000 immediately in order reach a goal of 1 million Facebook fans in just 30 days — just before POTUS visit.

” 6. This money would be used in three areas. First, it would increase direct advertising via Facebook. Currently, Embassy Jakarta spends less than $25 per day on advertising, and nets between 300-400 new fans daily. Increasing this tenfold over 30 days, results in a gain of 100,000 to 120,000 fans. The funds would also be used to promote the visit and our fan page as the place to learn more by extensively advertising on Indonesian online portals, banner ads, YouTube, Twitter, and other promotional efforts, including embedding bloggers, contests and giveaways, and using SMS technology. With over 100 million mobile phone users in Indonesia, texting is a powerful way to include a huge audience. Partnering with a major telecom provider, we can encourage Indonesians to sign up for real-time updates via their cell phone — a great way to reach those not yet online about the visit. Cost: $60,000.

7. Another key promotion strategy to generate interest will be offering a “golden ticket” via Facebook. We propose making a dream come true for one lucky Indonesian, by providing an opportunity to meet POTUS during his visit. If the White House approves, we could invite fans to post why they should meet President Obama, and in doing so, use our social media platform to connect fans to the visit, as well as build excitement beforehand and follow-up coverage afterwards. In addition, we could partner with a local TV station to have a “finalist” show and increase coverage. RSO would ensure any winner(s) are vetted for security issues. If the White House would not agree to this, an alternate “dream prize” might be an educational trip to the U.S. Cost: $15,000.

8. Third, in order to implement these ideas in this limited time-frame, we need short-term expert help on this promotion in the form of a qualified local digital marketing agency, who could assist the Embassy’s new media team (currently one officer and three FSNs working on it part-time). Cost: $25,000.”



January 18, 2011 Posted by | cognitive infilltration, FaceBook, Indonesia, Mission Indonesia, P2P, Peer-to-Peer, POTUS, social media, social networks, Twitter, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, WikiLeaks, YouTube | Leave a comment

#WIKILEAKS #USembassycables #France #2005 [http://bit.ly/hUj0Zy]



US embassy cables: France under fire over support for Tunisia

Guardian, 18 Jan 2011


* cable date: 16 Nov 2005

* last section :

7. (C) Comment: We view this controversy as indicative of the degree to which President Chirac’s “stability first” and tradition of cultivating close relations with aging Arab world dictators is increasingly out of step with current realities and prevailing media opinion in France. While the media focus on the Boltanski attack may subside in coming days, we expect that the GoF will remain vulnerable to further domestic criticism for inaction on human rights issues in Tunisia — as the MFA speculated, as long as Chirac remains president. End comment. Please visit Paris’




January 18, 2011 Posted by | France, Tunisia, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#WIKILEAKS #wikileakstunis ~ Two sets of U.S. Embassy cables for Tunisia



2008



2009


Both : Ambassador Robert F. Godec



January 16, 2011 Posted by | U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#TUNISIA #WIKILEAKS #socialmedia #twitrev ~ Was What Happened in Tunisia a Twitter Revolution? II



[1] The febrile debate in the social media about Tunisia is comical because the bien pensers know little about Tunisia, are rushing to conclusions with the basics, cobbling together their social network theories from what they think/guess to be a good example of a digitial revolution, and hoping for the best. Though the Internet, Web and social media, must have played a part, it’s primarily a political debate which I doubt many of the social media types are qualified to engage in – more a bit of a shouting match in a pub.

A few are getting really excited because they have written books on similar themes and think they might be writing a few more on the back of this crisis, and be invited into the TV studious as experts on the Twitter revolution. Have any, one wonders, even had a holiday Djerba?

Tunisia has been under the thumb from way back in the days of Bourguiba.

[2] The riots are a middle class phenomenon. Use your eyes! The No comment Euronews video yesterday showed middle-aged laywers still in their black robes, mingling with and shouting encouragement to the youth in centre of Tunis! And in those masses were students shouting that they were educated and had no jobs.

[3] The 1789 French Revolution was undoubtedly a revolution of the small, mobile printing press – the press facilitated the spread of ideas that led to the coup. But the French Revolution was a revolt of the middle-classes against arbitrary Monarchic rule, as was the American Revolution. Here, we need to Google our Gore Vidal YouTubes to see his barbed comments about the United States of America never having been a democracy.

[4] WikiLeaks showed two things about Tunisia:

[a] The U.S. supported Tunisia because Tunisia supported the U.S. over the war on terror. We have to ask if Tunisia might have been involved in extraordinary rendition like Morocco and Egypt were. Maybe not, but the likihood is great – Tunisia has been under authoritarian rule since 1957.

[b] The diplomatic cables showed the U.S. was aware that something was brewing in Tunisia.



January 15, 2011 Posted by | actor-network theory, Citizen 2.0, citizen journalism, connective knowledge, connectivism, cyber security, cyber-utopianism, cyberpunk, cyberspace, cypherpunk, data journalism, digital journalism, diplomatic cables, Government 2.0, info-war, Internet, P2P, Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act (PCNAA), social media, social networks, techno-libertarianism, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, Web 2.0, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#TUNISIA #WIKILEAKS #socialmedia #twitrev ~ Was What Happened in Tunisia a Twitter Revolution?



Was What Happened in Tunisia a Twitter Revolution?


Mathew Ingram, 14 Jan 2011



January 15, 2011 Posted by | actor-network theory, diplomatic cables, info-war, Internet, internet activism, investigative journalism, Iraq war logs, Julian Assange, net neutrality, network theory, on-line rights, Open data, P2P, Twitter, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, WikiLeaks | Leave a comment

#TUNISIA #WIKILEAKS #socialmedia #twitrev ~ Twitter revolution and the new Arab Media Space?



Tunisia and the New Arab Media Space
Marc Lynch, Foreign Policy, 15 Jan 2011


Tunisia: Can We Please Stop Talking About ‘Twitter Revolutions’
Luke Allnutt, Tanglered Web blog, 15 Jan 2011




The WDIK column
Twitter is proving to be important. It wouldn’t be so important if there were no mobile feeds into the system.

The Tunisian authorities, it is reported, had the Internet as tight as a gnats bottom – as China has. Though the news is that just before he flew the coop to Malta/France/Saudi Arabia (probably right now sitting down by the poolside with an ice-cool Carlesberg, evoking for me the iconic Heinekin scene at the end of Ice Cold in Alex…oh, perhaps not, it’s a dry country),



Internet Ali removed some of the filters. Or – as we’ll learn sooner than later – the current regime did, in order to reduce the pressure.



January 15, 2011 Posted by | actor-network theory, anonymity online, anonymous whistleblowing, China, Citizen 2.0, citizen journalism, connective knowledge, connectivism, cyber security, cyber-utopianism, cyberspace, data journalism, data leakage, data security, data-dump journalism, digital journalism, diplomatic cables, Government 2.0, Govt 3.0, Indentity Ecosystem Framework, info-war, insider security, insider threats, Internet, internet activism, internet-centrism, investigative journalism, Julian Assange, Manning, media, net neutrality, Network security, network theory, on-line rights, Open data, open source, P2P, P2P Foundation, Peer-to-Peer, privacy, Single Person Organisation [SPO], social media, social networks, techno-libertarianism, Tim Burners-Lee, trust, trust models, Twitter, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, WikiLeaks, WikiLeaks vs. The Yes Men | Leave a comment

#WIKILEAKS #mediadebate #datajournalism #isassangeajournalist ~ The Frontline Club “On the Media” debate, 11 January 2011 [http://bit.ly/evOlDB]


We never know for certain what another person is really thinking. Even if they chose to tell us, we can never know whether they’re telling the truth, or the whole truth. And by the same token nobody can can know our thoughts as we can know them.



Ralph Messenger, Director Centre for Cognitive Science, ‘The University of Gloucester’ – David Lodge’s novel “…Thinks.”



Frontline Club “On the Media: WikiLeaks Holding a mirror to journalism” discussion in association with BBC College of Journalism held 11 Jan 2011.


Hosted by Richard Gizbert – presenter, Al Jazeera English


Panel


Ian Katz – Guardian, deputy editor
David Aaronovitch – Times columnist (homepage)
Gavin MacFayden – director of The Centre for Investigative Journalism
Mark Stephens – media lawyer, currently on the Assange team



January 13, 2011 Posted by | "Collateral Murder" video, Afghanistan documents, anonymous whistleblowing, citizen journalism, Daniel Ellsberg, data journalism, data leakage, data security, data-dump journalism, Frontline Club, Guardian, investigative journalism, Iraq War 2003, Iraq war logs, Israel Shamir, New York Times, Shell/Nigeria, Twitter, U.S. diplomatic cables, U.S.Embassy cables, WikiLeaks, Yemen | Leave a comment